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  • Keeping HOA and Condo Common Areas Clean During the Coronavirus Pandemic

    During these unprecedented times, residents are spending the majority of their time at home to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and protect themselves and their loved ones from infection. One of their primary contact points with the outside world is in your HOA or condo common areas, where they can be at risk of contact with lingering coronavirus or even spread existing virus to other areas of the property. Read on for a comprehensive list of places to clean and how to clean them.
  • When a Natural Disaster Strikes, Is Your Association Covered?

    Hurricanes. Floods. Tornadoes. Hail. Wildfires. Lightning strikes. Earthquakes. Blizzards. Mother Nature has quite the arsenal to throw at us! Unfortunately, every part of North America is subject to one or more of these events. Some, like hurricanes, come with enough advance warning to prepare for them, but most do not. That’s why it is critical to the financial health of your community association to have the proper insurance coverage in place.
  • News You Can Use: Flash Flood Safety Tips to Keep Your Family Safe

    In many parts of the country, flash flood watches and/or flash flood warnings are often issued during torrential downpours, especially in hurricane-prone and/or low-lying areas.
  • Power Outages and Blackouts - How Your Association Can Minimize Risk

    Losing power is never fun. But it’s bound to happen at some point, so preparation is the best defense. Obviously, different types of communities are affected by blackouts in different critical ways: high-rises lose their elevators and water; resort-style gated communities lose the ability to operate their gates. For residents, a blackout may be a short-term nuisance. For a community association, it can be a major headache in terms of risk management, safety and potential equipment damage that can provide an unwelcome shock to your budget.
  • Why Preparation for This Hurricane Season is Important for Your Community

    Is your community prepared to weather a storm? June 1st marks the beginning of the 2016 hurricane season running through November 30th. The National Weather Service reports that, of an average of 12 tropical storms that form over the Atlantic Ocean each year, six become hurricanes. In the Central Pacific, an average of three tropical storms form, with two escalating to full-blown hurricane status. Figures like these make hurricanes a very real threat for many communities and homeowners. In fact, 2016 promises to be anything but your average year. Let’s take a look at why you may want to approach this year in a way that’s as unique as the weather conditions themselves.
  • Promoting Fire Safety in Your Community Association

    Part of your job as a board member is ensuring the safety of residents in your community association. To that end, it’s important to educate homeowners about possible fire risks and the steps they can take to prevent fire hazards in their homes. Chances are that fire safety isn’t top of mind for residents. However, home fires are more common than most people realize.
  • Simple Landscaping Tips To Help You Prepare for Storm Season

    For most of us, storm season means prepping our residences to mitigate potential damage caused by high winds and heavy rains. But there’s a part of our homes and neighborhoods we often overlook – sometimes with disastrous results. That often-forgotten place is right outside your front door: it’s your landscaping.
  • How can a community prepare for a tornado?

    Tornadoes are fearsome because of their unpredictable nature. Although there are certain weather conditions that make tornadoes more likely, such as severe summer thunderstorms, tornadoes can also be created by snowstorms and blizzards. They can strike at any time of year and almost any place, even forming on the water and moving onto land.
  • Updating Your Community Emergency Preparedness Plan for Pandemics

    In the past, when planning for emergencies, a global pandemic was likely not on your list. While most board members did not anticipate a pandemic as something that needed a plan before COVID-19, it's now clear that communities need to develop a plan to address this and any future pandemics. Read on to learn how to build a community emergency preparedness plan with a possible resurgence of coronavirus and other potential pandemics in mind.
  • What to Know in the Unlikely Event of a Mass Shooting in Your Building

    Public Mass shootings have unfortunately become common place in America and around the world. From schools and movie theaters, to businesses and homes, shootings have occurred in a mix of environments. But what should you do if you unexpectedly find yourself in the middle of this kind of emergency at your residential building?
  • What Do I Need To Know About Floods?

    2016 saw the United States swamped in a record year of flooding, the most since record keeping began in 1980. Devastating flooding swept Louisiana, West Virginia, Texas and Maryland, costing billions in damage. In Canada, about half of all natural disaster costs are incurred from flooding, reaching into the billions of dollars in recent years.
  • Why Your Community Must Plan for Emergency Communication and Training

    Whether you live in a high-rise condominium in Chicago, a homeowners association (HOA) in Houston or an active adult community in Las Vegas, emergencies can happen. Do you think your residents would know where to go or whom to contact in an emergency situation? Does your onsite staff know what to do to protect residents and the community’s property in the event of a major storm like a hurricane, tornado or severe blizzard? How well would they handle a flood, a fire or a violent outbreak?
  • What to Know About an HOA Emergency Board Meeting During Trying Times

    It's hurricane season again. As soon as June 1st rolls around, we are assaulted with hurricane preparedness pamphlets and emergency information at every turn.
  • Communication in an Emergency is Key to Hurricane Preparation and Rebuilding

    The strongest hurricane preparedness plan won’t be effective if you haven’t communicated it. Make sure that everyone knows what to do by following these important recommendations.
  • Energy Efficiency for Community Associations

    Many community association boards and residents would like to implement energy efficiency measures in their communities. But what about the cost to get started?
  • First Locally Transmitted Virus Case Confirmed for Zika in Florida

    In February, the World Health Organization declared a public health emergency when cases of the Zika virus began to spread, impacting Florida.
  • Five Simple Tips for Marketing Your Association

    Nothing says a healthy community like full homes/units and bustling activity in common areas. Painting a pretty picture of a dynamic community to potential buyers takes minimal effort on the part of the board.
  • Six things you should know about flood insurance in Florida

    As a Floridian, you're pretty familiar with flood insurance, but you may not be aware of the recent changes in the law. Learn more here!
  • Four Ways to Get Mosquitoes to Buzz Off

    Ah, summertime in Florida. Backyard barbecues. Long days at the beach. And endless mosquito bites.
  • Hurricane Season is Here: Have You Talked to Your Vendors?

    Your vendors are a critical part of your community’s emergency planning for any kind of hurricane or storm. Are you on the same page before, during and after a storm?
  • What Does Florida Hurricane Insurance Cover?

    With hurricane season approaching, many community association boards are asking themselves: “Are we prepared to weather a storm?"
  • Is Installing Electric Vehicles Charging Stations the Right Choice for Your Community?

    The number of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) on the road is quickly growing, which means the need for conveniently located battery charging stations is also on the rise. What does this mean for your association?
  • Is Your Community Ready for Plug-In Electric Cars (PEVs) and Charging Stations?

    The Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt made their debut as the first US mass-market plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) more than five years ago. Nearly half a million have jumped on the PEV bandwagon. What does this mean for community associations?
  • Be Prepared with These Landscaping Safety Tips for Hurricanes

    This hurricane season, start your preparations from the outside in with these 13 landscaping quick fixes.
Showing 25 - 48 of 142